Jump to content

Alphard rear springs


Recommended Posts

Hi, thought I would start a new thread on fitting Heavy Duty Rear Springs to my 2007 Alphard, which would follow on from my recent posts. As I said in my last post, I had tried to change both springs, but even with the correct spring compressors and 4 post lift, I couldn't compress the springs enough to remove them. I decided to book into my friendly garage who do our MOT Tests and major work if needed.

I won't describe how they were changed[1hour],as my advice is leave this job to the professionals. There is always the danger that if I describe the method, someone may try to do it for themselves, get it wrong and I could be in trouble.

What I will say is, that the problem was the difficulty in swinging the axle beam down enough to get the old springs out and the new ones in. Two problems prevented this,one was the ABS sensors which needed to be disconnected and the flexible brake pipes/hoses which also needed to be disconnected. I took two mechanics to then pull the axle beam down enough to remove the old and push in the new.

The Alphard now stands as it should and the bonus is that the new stronger springs have reduced the roll on cornering to some extent and towing our box van means that being able to have a correct trailer nose weight, will make towing more stable.[All for £62!  bargain! with no hassle].

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, starider said:

Hi, thought I would start a new thread on fitting Heavy Duty Rear Springs to my 2007 Alphard, which would follow on from my recent posts. As I said in my last post, I had tried to change both springs, but even with the correct spring compressors and 4 post lift, I couldn't compress the springs enough to remove them. I decided to book into my friendly garage who do our MOT Tests and major work if needed.

I won't describe how they were changed[1hour],as my advice is leave this job to the professionals. There is always the danger that if I describe the method, someone may try to do it for themselves, get it wrong and I could be in trouble.

What I will say is, that the problem was the difficulty in swinging the axle beam down enough to get the old springs out and the new ones in. Two problems prevented this, one was the ABS sensors which needed to be disconnected and the flexible brake pipes/hoses which also needed to be disconnected. It took two mechanics to then pull the axle beam down enough to remove the old and push in the new.

The Alphard now stands as it should and the bonus is that the new stronger springs have reduced the roll on cornering to some extent and towing our box van means that being able to have a correct trailer nose weight, will make towing more stable.[All for £62!  bargain! with no hassle].

 

Good morning,

 

Nice to have a happy ending.

 

I would also caution members on changing springs themselves; putting themselves in harm's way.

 

If anything goes wrong, a spring doesn't locate properly in the spring compressor (or moves during compression), or, as in my case (many years ago), a spring compressor fails under compression; a very dangerous situation can occur without notice.

 

If an Alphard is 2 tonnes, each compressor is supporting 500kg minimum. If the tension is released instantly, a lot of damage can occur when that spring hits anything, you included.

 

As Starider says, £62 is a bargain, and much safer than risking yourself.

I doubt you can purchase a sturdy compressors for that price !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,  I actually have 4 sets of spring compressors of varying strengths and sizes, but were still very aware of the dangers. I watched the process from a safe distance and because of the amount of movement they were able to get,the springs were easily gently levered out. The new springs although a lot stronger, with a mechanic heaving down on the suspended wheel and a liberal coating of silicon on the seatings,plus a little force, the springs popped into place, once in their seats each one was able to be turned into their correct position. The profile of the seatings is quite deep and it was these that caused some of the problems. Also there is little room to to attach compressors evenly.

I totally agree with you,I definately wouldn't advise anyone to try to do it DIY. Talking to the workshop manager, he re- counted many horror stories of springs flying round workshops and the damage caused.

As I have said before I, in recent years changed rear springs on my Suzuki Vitara very easily and quickly, but the springs were shorter and the rear suspension movement was a lot less.

I would suggest you find a small well recommened independant garage and call in for a quote. We are lucky,we have an excellent relationship with our garage and the Manager is of the same generation as myself and we spend a lot of time talking about classic cars and tractors when I go in for MOT Tests or for work to be done!

Hope what Rojie and I have said helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How on earth did you manage to find a garage workshop that charged you £62.0 ?  The  average garage rates here in the south of England are now £75.00 + and you indicated two mechanics were involved in the work !😦

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, ThuMentaliss said:

How on earth did you manage to find a garage workshop that charged you £62.0 ?  The  average garage rates here in the south of England are now £75.00 + and you indicated two mechanics were involved in the work !😦

 

Perhaps one of the benefits of living in a rural part of the country.

I pay £60/hr for my Fords, and £70/hr for my Jaguar specialist at different local garages.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Yep, living "down yer in dear ole Devon" has it's advantages, but many disadvantages, we only have 3 buses a week, one to Barnstaple,one to Holsworthy and one to Tavistock and if you miss any of these it's a taxi fare home! To get anywhere is by car[or tractor], and any real shopping is at least a 20mile round trip away.One of the mechanics was only involved for about 10mins, and I do know the staff really well.

Edited by starider
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/6/2022 at 11:38 PM, starider said:

Yep, living "down yer in dear ole Devon" has it's advantages, but many disadvantages, we only have 3 buses a week, one to Barnstaple,one to Holsworthy and one to Tavistock and if you miss any of these it's a taxi fare home! To get anywhere is by car[or tractor], and any real shopping is at least a 20mile round trip away.One of the mechanics was only involved for about 10mins, and I do know the staff really well.

Great,  perhaps I should drive down to Devon from Brighton and get my work done cheaper,  here a two rear spring replacement approx' 2.0 hrs work plus equipment to allow radius achieved to allow axle /spring beam clearance  could cost £200 +

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Blimey!! Seems awfully expensive to me, at their prices £100 per hour!! wow.If,as they should, be able to do the job in 1hour that's £100 extra profit. Perhaps they didn't want the job. What is the equipment they use other than a lift and spring compressors, I've never ever been billed for equipment!

Edited by starider
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.